Aug 032016
 

xmms logoYeah, I’m still using the good old xmms v1 on Linux and UNIX. Now, the boxes I used to play music on were all 32-bit x86 so far. Just some old hardware. Recently I tried to play some of my [AAC-LC] files on my 64-bit Linux workstation, and to my surprise, it failed to play the file, giving me the error Pulse coding not allowed in short blocks when started from the shell (just so I can read the error output).

I thought this had to have something to do with my file and not the player, so I tried .aac files with ADTS headers instead of audio packed into an mp4/m4a container. The result was the same. Also, the encoding (SBR/VBR or even HE-AAC, which sucks for music anyway) didn’t make a difference. Then I found [this post] on the Gentoo forums, showing that the problem was really the architecture. 32-bit builds wouldn’t fail, but the source code of the [libfaad2] decoding library of xmms’ mp4 plugin wasn’t ready for 64-bit.

xmms’ xmms_mp4Plugin-0.4 comes with a pretty old libfaad2, 2.0 or something. I will show you how to upgrade that to version 2.7, which is fixed for x86_64 (Readily fixed source code is also provided at the bottom). We’ll also fix up other parts of that plugin so it can compile using more modern versions of GCC and clang, and my test platform for this would be a rather conservative CentOS 6.8 Linux. First, get the source code:

I’m assuming you already have xmms installed, otherwise obtain version 1.2.11 from [here]!

Step 1, libfaad2:

Unpack both archives from above, then enter the mp4 plugins’ source directory. You’ll find a libfaad2/ directory in there. Delete or move it and all of its contents. From the faad2 source tree, copy the directory libfaad/ from there to libfaad2/ in the plugins’ directory, replacing the deleted one. Now that’s the source, but we also need the updated headers so that the xmms plugin can link against the newer libfaad2. To do that, copy the two files include/faad.h and include/neaacdec.h from the faad2 2.7 source tree to the directory include/ in the plugin source tree. Overwrite faad.h if prompted.

Step 2, libmp4v2:

Also, the bundled libmp4v2 of the mp4 plugin is very old and broken on modern systems due to code issues. Let’s fix them, so back to the mp4 plugin source tree. We need to fix some invalid pure specifiers in the following files: libmp4v2/mp4property.h, libmp4v2/mp4property.cpp, libmp4v2/rtphint.h and libmp4v2/rtphint.cpp.

To do so, open them in a text editor and search and replace all occurences of = NULL with = 0. This will fix all assignments and comparisons that would otherwise break. When using vi or vim, you can do :%s/=\sNULL/= 0/g for this.

On top of that, we need to fix a invalid const char* to char* conversion in libmp4v2/rtphint.cpp as well. Open it, and hop to line number 325, you’ll see this:

  1. char* pSlash = strchr(pRtpMap, '/');

Replace it with this:

  1. const char* pSlash = strchr(pRtpMap, '/');

And we’re done!

Now, in the mp4 plugins’ source root directory, run $ ./bootstrap && ./configure. Hopefully, no errors will occur. If all is ok, run $ make. Given you have xmms 1.2.11 installed, it should compile and link fine now. Last step: # make install.

This has been tested with my current GCC 4.4.7 platform compiler as well as GCC 4.9.3 on CentOS 6.8 Linux. Also, it has been tested with clang 3.4.1 on FreeBSD 10.3 UNIX, also x86_64. Please note that FreeBSD 10.3 needs extensive modifications to its build tools as well, so I can’t provide fixed source for this. However, packages on FreeBSD have already been fixed in that regard, so you can just # pkg install xmms-faad2 and it’s done anyway. This is likely the case for several modern Linux distros as well.

Let’s play:

xmms playing AAC-LC Freebsd 10.3 UNIX on x86_64

Yeah, it works. In this case on FreeBSD.

And the shell would say:

2-MPEG-4 AAC Low Complexity profile
MP4 - 2 channels @ 44100 Hz

Perfect! And here is the [fixed source code] upgraded with libfaad2 2.7, so you don’t have to do anything by yourself other than $ ./bootstrap && ./configure && make and # make install! Ah, actually I’m not so sure whether xmms itself builds fine on CentOS 6.8 from source these days… Maybe I’ll check that out another day. ;)

Apr 182015
 

The Hoff - True Survivor (Kung Fury)Think about David Hasselhoff what you will, but one thing’s fore sure: He’s definitely an icon of the 80s of the past millennium, there’s no denying that. And now he’s really pulled one off, as he did the official intro song for the crowd funded movie “Kung Fury“, that set sail to collect all the 80s charm and weave it into a crazy action comedy of yet unseen proportions. Let’s give you a few buzz words right there: Cops, Kung Fu, hacking time itself, Kung Führer (yes, Hitler), ancient female viking warriors with guns, dinosaurs, evil robots. That’s enough for now I’m guessing.

The thing here is, that it’s not just the Hoff making some PR for Kung Fury – though it’ll most definitely work quite well in that regard – the song is actually catchy and surprisingly good, capturing the very soul of the 80s perfectly!

"True Survivor" single cover

“True Survivor (from Kung Fury)” single cover (click to enlarge)

Now, before I show you the music video, you should probably take a look at the official Kung Fury web site or maybe [here] first, to read about what Kung Fury is supposed to be, and to watch the official trailer. Whet that’s done, take a look at the madness The Hoff has created here, together with a lot of scenes from the actual movie:


As of 2015-04-18, 11:00 UTC+1 DST, this video has had about 2.1 million views on YouTube, having been online for roughly 2 days. Never doubt The Hoff!

Now if you want fun, and over-the-top 80s cheesiness, you’ll love this piece of trash (I just went ahead and bought the song, and I rarely do that), and you should probably go watch Kung Fury in any way you can when it’s being released next month! It will even come as a free download, heh, talk about awesome!

Awe..

..some.

Nov 142014
 

MOD Music on FreeBSD 10 with xmmsAs much as I am a WinAmp 2 lover on Microsoft Windows, I am an xmms lover on Linux and UNIX. And by that I mean xmms1, not 2. And not Audacious. Just good old xmms. Not only does it look like a WinAmp 2 clone, it even loads WinAmp 2/5 skins and supports a variety of rather obscure plugins, which I partially need and love (like for Commodore 64 SID tunes via libsidplay or libsidplay2 with awesome reSID engine support).

Recently I started playing around with a free Laptop I got and which I wanted to be my operating systems test bed. Currently, I am evaluating – and probably keeping – FreeBSD 10 UNIX. Now it ain’t perfect, but it works pretty well after a bit of work. Always using Linux or XP is just a bit boring by now. ;)

One of the problems I had was with xmms. While the package is there, its built-in tracker module file (mod, 669, it, s3m etc.) support is broken. Play one of those and its xmms-mikmod plugin will cause a segmentation fault immediately when talking to a newer version of libmikmod. Also, recompiling [multimedia/xmms] from the ports tree produced a binary with the same fault. Then I found this guy [Jakob Steltner] posting about the problem on the ArchLinux bugtracker, [see here].

Based on his work, I created a ports tree compatible patch patch-drv_xmms.c, here is the source code:

  1. --- Input/mikmod/drv_xmms.c.orig        2003-05-19 23:22:06.000000000 +0200
  2. +++ Input/mikmod/drv_xmms.c     2012-11-16 18:52:41.264644767 +0100
  3. @@ -117,6 +117,10 @@
  4.         return VC_Init();
  5.  }
  6.  
  7. +static void xmms_CommandLine(CHAR * commandLine)
  8. +{
  9. +}
  10. +
  11.  MDRIVER drv_xmms =
  12.  {
  13.         NULL,
  14. @@ -126,7 +130,8 @@
  15.  #if (LIBMIKMOD_VERSION > 0x030106)
  16.          "xmms",
  17.          NULL,
  18. -#endif
  19. +#endif
  20. +       xmms_CommandLine, // Was missing
  21.          xmms_IsThere,
  22.         VC_SampleLoad,
  23.         VC_SampleUnload

So that means recompiling xmms from source by yourself. But fear not, it’s relatively straightforward on FreeBSD 10.

Assuming that you unpacked your ports tree as root by running portsnap fetch and portsnap extract without altering anything, you will need to put the file in /usr/ports/multimedia/xmms/files/ and then cd to that directory on a terminal. Now run make && make install as root. The patch will be applied automatically.

Now one can once again run xmms and module files just work as they’re supposed to:

A patched xmms playing a MOD file on FreeBSD 10

xmms playing a MOD file on FreeBSD 10 via a patched xmms-mikmod (click to enlarge)

The sad thing is, soon xmms will no longer be with us, at least on FreeBSD. It’s now considered abandonware, as all development has ceased. The xmms port on FreeBSD doesn’t even have a maintainer anymore and it’s [scheduled for deletion] from the ports tree together with all its plugins from [ports/audio] and [ports/multimedia]. I just wish I could speak C to some degree and work on that myself. But well…

Seems my favorite audio player is finally dying, but as with all the other old software I like and consider superior to modern alternatives, I’m gonna keep it alive for as long as possible!

You can download Jakobs’ patch that I adapted for the FreeBSD ports tree right here:

Have fun! :)

Edit: xmms once again has a maintainer for its port on FreeBSD, so we can rejoice! I have [submitted the patch to FreeBSDs bugzilla] as suggested by [SirDice] on the [FreeBSD Forums], and Naddy, the ports maintainer integrated the patch promptly! It’s been committed since [revision 375356]! So now you don’t need to patch it by hand and recompile it from source code anymore – at least not on x86 machines. You can either build it from ports as-is or just pull a fully working binary version from the packages repository on FreeBSD 10.x by running pkg install xmms.

I tested this on FreeBSD 10.0 and 10.1 and it works like a charm, so thanks fly out to Jakob and Naddy! Even though my involvement here was absolutely minimal, it feels awesome to do something good, and help improving a free software project, even if only marginally so. :)