Mar 012017
 

Notepadqq @ CentOS 6 Linux logoIt’s rather rare for me to look for a replacement of some good Windows software for Linux/UNIX instead of the other way around, but the source code editor [Notepad++] is one example of such software. The program gedit on the Gnome 2 desktop environment of my old CentOS 6 enterprise Linux isn’t bad, but it isn’t exactly good either. The thing I was missing most was a search & replace engine capable of regular expressions.

Of course, vi can do it, but at times, vi can be a bit hard to use, so I kinda looked for a Notepad++ replacement. What I found was [Notepadqq], which is basically a clone using the Qt5 UI. However, this editor is clearly made for more modern systems, but I still looked for a way to get it to compile and run on my CentOS 6.8 x86_64 Linux system. And I found one. Here are the most important prerequisites:

  • A new enough GCC (I used 6.2.0), because the v4.4.7 platform compiler won’t work with the modern C++ stuff
  • Qt5 libraries from the [EPEL] repository
  • git

First, you’ll want a new compiler. That part is surprisingly easy, but a bit time consuming. First, download a fresh GCC tarball from a server on the [mirrors list], those are in the releases/ subdirectory, so a file like gcc-6.3.0.tar.bz2 (My version is still 6.2.0). It seems Notepadqq only needs some GCC 5, but since our platform compiler won’t cut it anyway, why not just use the latest?

Now, once more, this will take time, could well be hours, so you might wanna do the compilation step over night, the last step needs root privileges:

$ tar -xzvf ./gcc-6.3.0.tar.bz2
$ cd ./gcc-6.3.0/
$ ./configure --program-suffix="-6.3.0"
$ make
# make install

And when you do this, please never forget to add a --program-suffix for the configuration step!  You might seriously fuck things up if you miss that! So double-check it!

When that’s finally done, let’s handle Qt5 next. I’ll be using a binary distribution to make things easy, and yeah, I didn’t just install the necessary packages, I got the whole Qt5 blob instead, too lazy to do the cherry picking. Oh, and if you don’t have it, add git as well:

# yum install https://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/epel-release-latest-6.noarch.rpm
# yum install qt5* git

I assume # yum install qt5-qtwebkit qt5-qtwebkit-devel qt5-qtsvg qt5-qtsvg-devel qt5-qttools qt5-qttools-devel should also be enough according to the requirements, but I didn’t try that. Now, enter a free directory or one you generally use for source code and fetch the latest Notepadqq version (this will create a subfolder we’ll cd to):

$ git clone https://github.com/notepadqq/notepadqq.git
$ cd ./notepadqq

After that, we need to make sure that we’ll be using the correct compiler and that we’re linking against the correct libraries that came with it (like libstdc++.so.6.*). To do that, set the following environment variables, assuming you’re using the bash as your shell (use lib/ instead of lib64/ folders if you’re on 32-bit x86):

$ export CC="gcc-6.3.0"
$ export CXX="g++-6.3.0"
$ export CPP="cpp-6.3.0"
$ export CFLAGS="-I/usr/local/include/ -L/usr/local/lib64/"
$ export CXXFLAGS="-I/usr/local/include/ -L/usr/local/lib64/"
$ export LDFLAGS="-L/usr/local/lib64/"

The C-related settings are probably not necessary as Qt5 stuff should be pure C++, but you’ll never know, so let’s play it safe.

With that we’re including and linking against the correct libraries and we’ll be using our modern compiler as well. Time to actually compile Notepadqq. To do that, we’ll still need to tell it where to find the Qt5 versions of the qmake and lrelease binaries, but luckily, we can solve that with some simple configuration options. So, let’s do this, the last step requires root privileges again, from within the notepadqq/ directory that git clone created for us:

$ ./configure --qmake /usr/bin/qmake-qt5 --lrelease /usr/bin/lrelease-qt5
$ make
# make install

Now, there are some weird linking issues that I never got fixed on CentOS (some developer please tell me how, I have the same crap when building x265!). Because of that we still can’t launch Notepadqq as-is, we need to give it an LD_LIBRARY_PATH to find the proper libraries at runtime. Let’s just create an executable launcher script /usr/local/sbin/notepadqq.sh for that. Edit it and enter the following code:

#!/bin/sh
LD_LIBRARY_PATH="/usr/local/lib64" /usr/local/bin/notepadqq "$@"

Use this as your launcher script for Notepadqq and you’re good to go with your Notepad++ replacement on good old CentOS 6.x:

Running Notepadqq on CentOS 6 Linux

Running the latest Notepadqq on CentOS 6 Linux with Qt5 version 5.6.1, state 2017-03-01

Now, let’s see whether it’s even that good actually… :roll:

Jan 272016
 

HakuNeko logoJust yesterday I’ve showed you how to modify and compile the [HakuNeko] Manga Ripper so it can work on FreeBSD 10 UNIX, [see here] for some background info. I also mentioned that I couldn’t get it to build on CentOS 6 Linux, something I chose to investigate today. After flying blind for a while trying to fix include paths and other things, I finally got to the core of the problem, which lies in HakuNekos’ src/CurlRequest.cpp, where the code calls CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING from cURLs typecheck-gcc.h. This is critical stuff, as [cURL] is the software library needed for actually connecting to websites and downloading the image files of Manga/Comics.

It turns out that CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING wasn’t always called that. With cURL version 7.21.6, it was renamed to that from the former CURLOPT_ENCODING as you can read [here]. And well, CentOS 6 ships with cURL 7.19.7…

When running $ ./configure && make from the unpacked HakuNeko source tree without fixing anything, you’ll run into this problem:

g++ -c -Wall -O2 -I/usr/lib64/wx/include/gtk2-unicode-release-2.8 -I/usr/include/wx-2.8 -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64 -D_LARGE_FILES -D__WXGTK__ -pthread -o obj/CurlRequest.cpp.o src/CurlRequest.cpp
src/CurlRequest.cpp: In member function ‘void CurlRequest::SetCompression(wxString)’:
src/CurlRequest.cpp:122: error: ‘CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING’ was not declared in this scope
make: *** [obj/CurlRequest.cpp.o] Error 1

So you’ll have to fix the call in src/CurlRequest.cpp! Look for this part:

  1. void CurlRequest::SetCompression(wxString Compression)
  2. {
  3.     if(curl)
  4.     {
  5.         curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING, (const char*)Compression.mb_str(wxConvUTF8));
  6.         //curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING, (const char*)memcpy(new wxByte[Compression.Len()], Compression.mb_str(wxConvUTF8).data(), Compression.Len()));
  7.     }
  8. }

Change CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING to CURLOPT_ENCODING. The rest can stay the same, as the name is all that has really changed here. It’s functionally identical as far as I can tell. So it should look like this:

  1. void CurlRequest::SetCompression(wxString Compression)
  2. {
  3.     if(curl)
  4.     {
  5.         curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_ENCODING, (const char*)Compression.mb_str(wxConvUTF8));
  6.         //curl_easy_setopt(curl, CURLOPT_ACCEPT_ENCODING, (const char*)memcpy(new wxByte[Compression.Len()], Compression.mb_str(wxConvUTF8).data(), Compression.Len()));
  7.     }
  8. }

Save the file, go back to the main source tree and you can do:

  • $ ./configure && make
  • # make install

And done! Works like a charm:

HakuNeko fetching Haiyore! Nyaruko-san on CentOS 6.7 Linux

HakuNeko fetching Haiyore! Nyaruko-san on CentOS 6.7 Linux!

And now, for your convenience I fixed up the Makefile and rpm/SPECS/specfile.spec a little bit to build proper rpm packages as well. I can provide them for CentOS 6.x Linux in both 32-bit as well as 64-bit x86 flavors:

You need to unzip these first, because I was too lazy to allow the rpm file type in my blogging software.

The naked rpms have also been submitted to the HakuNeko developers as a comment to their [More Linux Packages] support ticket which you’re supposed to use for that purpose, so you can get them from there as well. Not sure if the developers will add the files to the projects’ official downloads.

This build of HakuNeko has been linked against the wxWidgets 2.8.12 GUI libraries, which come from the official CentOS 6.7 package repositories. So you’ll need to install wxGTK to be able to use the white kitty:

  • # yum install wxGTK

After that you can install the .rpm package of your choice. For a 64-bit system for instance, enter the folder where the hakuneko_1.3.12_el6_x86_64.rpm file is, run # yum localinstall ./hakuneko_1.3.12_el6_x86_64.rpm and confirm the installation.

Now it’s time to have fun using HakoNeko on your Enterprise Linux system! Totally what RedHat intended you to use it for! ;) :roll: