Feb 252016
 

SlySoft logoIt’s over – after 13 years of being almost constantly under pressure by US-based companies, SlySoft finally had to close its doors. Most notably known for software such as CloneCD or AnyDVD, the Antiguan-based company has provided people all over the world with ways to quickly and easily circumvent disc-based copy protection mechanisms such as Sony ArcCos, CSS, ACSS or BD+ and many others for years.

The companys’ founder, a certain Mr. Giancarla Bettini had already been sued – and successfully so – before an Antiguan court. While it was strictly up to Antiguan Authorities to actually sue SlySoft (because the AACS-LA could not do so themselves due to some legal constraints), this did finally happen in 2012, fining Mr. Bettini for a sum of USD $30.000. That didn’t result in SlySoft closing down however.

What it was that happened exactly a few days ago is unclear, as SlySoft seems to be under NDA or maybe legal pressure as to not release any statement regarding the reasons for the shutdown, quote, “We were not allowed to respond to any request nor to post any statement”. The only thing that we have besides a forum thread with next to zero information is the statement on the official website, which is rather concise as well:

“Due to recent regulatory requirements we have had to cease all activities relating to SlySoft Inc.
We wish to thank our loyal customers/clients for their patronage over the years.”

It should be relatively clear however, that this has to have something to do with the AACS-LA and several movie studios as well as software and hardware companies “reminding” the United States government of SlySofts illicit activities just recently. This would’ve resulted in Antigua being put onto the US priority [watchlist] of countries violating US/international copyright laws. Ultimately, being put onto that list can result in trade barriers being put up within a short time, hurting a countrys’ economy, thus escalating the whole SlySoft thing to an international incident. More information [here].

AnyDVD HD

This little program and its little brothers made it all the way to the top and became an international incident! Quite the career…

It seems – and here is where my pure speculations start – that there was some kind of agreement found between SlySofts’ founder and the AACS-LA and/or the Antiguan and US governments resulting in the immediate shutdown of SlySoft without further consequences for either its founder or other members of the company. If true then SlySoft will surely also have to break their promise of releasing a “final” version of AnyDVD HD including all the decryption keys from the online database in case they have to close their doors forever. This is, what “[…] we have had to cease all activities relating to SlySoft Inc. […]” means after all.

So what are the consequences, technically?

I can only say for AnyDVD HD as according to the forums over at SlySoft, but the latest version 7.6.9.0 supposedly includes some 130.000 AACS keys and should still be able to decrypt a lot of Blu-Rays, even if not all of them.

In the end however, the situation can only deteriorate as time passes and new versions of AACS keys and BD+ certificates are being released, even if you bypass the removed DNS A-Records of key.slysoft.com and access one of the key servers by resolving the IP address locally (via your hosts file). Thing is, nobody can tell when SlySoft will be forced to implement more effective methods of making their services inaccessible, like by just switching off the machines themselves.

But even if they stay online for years to come, no new keys or certificates are going to be added, so it’s probably safe to say that the red fox is truly dead.

AddendumJust to be clear for those of you who are scared of even accessing any SlySoft machines with their real IPs any longer; According to a SlySoft employee (you can read it in their forums), all of the servers are still 100% under SlySofts physical control, and their storage backends are encrypted. They were not raided or anything. So it seems you do not have to fear “somebody else listening” on SlySofts key servers.

PS.: A sad day if you ask me, a victorious one if you ask the movie industry. Maybe somebody should just walk over and tell them, that cheaper, DRM-free media actually work a lot better on the market, when compared to jailing users into some “trusted” (by them) black boxes with forced software updates and closed software. Yeah, I actually want to play my BD movies on the PC (legally!!), and on systems based on free software like Linux and BSD UNIX as well, not on some blackboxed HW player, so go suck it down, Hollywood. I mean, I’m even BUYING your shit, for Christs’ sake…

Oh, by the way, China is actually sitting on that copyright watchlist (I mean, obviously), and they gave us DVDFab. Also, there are MakeMKV and [others as well]. We’ll see whether the AACS-LA can hunt them all down… And even if they can… Will it really make them more money? Debatable at best…

Red Fox logoUpdate: Those guys work fast! While SlySoft is gone, several of the developers have grabbed the software and moved the servers to Belize, the discussion forums have already been migrated and a new version 7.6.9.1 of AnyDVD HD has been released, including new keys and reconfigured to access the new key servers as well. The company is now called “Red Fox” and the forums can be accessed via [forum.redfox.bz].

By now, AnyDVD HD respects the old licenses as well, and this will stay this way for the transition period. Ultimately however, according to posts on the forums, people will have to buy new licenses, even if they had a lifetime license before. They also said they’ll cook up “something nice” for people who bought licenses just recently. Probably some kind of discount I presume.

Still, if I may quote one of the developers: “SlySoft is dead, long live RedFox!”

May 292014
 

Truecrypt LogoJust recently, I was happily hacking away at the Truecrypt 7.1a source code to enhance its abilities under Linux, and everybody was eagerly awaiting the next version of the open source disk encryption software since the developers told me they were working on “UEFI+GPT booting”, and now BOOM. Truecrypt website gone, forum gone, all former versions’ downloads gone. Replaced by a redirection to Truecrypts SourceForge site, showing a very primitive page telling users to migrate to Bitlocker on Windows and Filevault on MacOSX. And told to just “install some crypto stuff on Linux and follow the documentation”.

Seriously, what the fuck?

Just look at this shit (a snippet from the OSX part):

The Truecrypt website now

The Truecrypt website now

Farther up they’re saying the same thing, warning the user that it is not secure with the following addition: “as it may contain unfixed security issues”

There is also a new Truecrypt version 7.2 stripped of most of the functionality. It can only be used to decrypt and mount anymore, so this is their “migration version”. Funny thing is, the GPG signatures and keys seem to check out. It’s truly the Truecrypt developers’ keys that were used for signing the binaries.

Trying to get you a screenshot of the old web site for comparison from the WayBackMachine, you get this:

Can't fetch http://www.truecrypt.org from the WayBackMachine

Can’t fetch http://www.truecrypt.org from the WayBackMachine. Access denied.

Now, before I give you the related links, let me sum up the current theories as to what might have occurred here:

  • http://www.truecrypt.org has been attacked and compromised, along with the SourceForge Account (denied by SourceForge administrators atm) and the signing keys.
  • A 3-letter agency has put pressure on the Truecrypt foundation, forcing them to implement a back door. The devs burn the project instead.
  • The Truecrypt developers had enough of the pretty lacking donation support from the community and just let it die.
  • The crowdfunded Truecrypt Audit project found something very nasty (seems not to be the case according to auditors).
  • Truecrypt was an NSA project all along, and maintenance has become tedious. So they tell people to migrate to NSA-compromised solutions that are less work, as they don’t have to write the code themselves (Bitlocker, Filevault). Or, maybe an unannounced NSA backdoor was discovered after all. Of course, any compromise of commercial products stands unproven.

Here are some links from around the world, including statements by cryptographers who are members of the Truecrypt audit project:

If this is legit, it’s really, really, really bad. One of the worst things that could’ve happened. Ever. I pray that this is just a hack/deface and nothing more, but it sure as hell ain’t looking good!

There is no real cross-platform alternative, Bitlocker is not available to all Windows users, and we may be left with nothing but a big question mark over our heads. I hope that more official statements will come, but given the clandestine nature of the TC developers, this might never happen…

Update: This starts to look more and more legit. So if this is truly the end, I will dearly miss the Truecrypt forum. Such a great community with good, capable people. I learned a lot there. So Dan, nkro, xtxfw, catBot/booBot, BeardedBlunder and all you many others whose nicks my failing brain can not remember: I will likely never find you guys again on the web, but thanks for all your contributions!

Update 2: Recently, a man called Steve Barnhart, who had contact with Truecrypt auditor Matthew Green said, that a Truecrypt developer named “David” had told him via email, that whichever developers were still left had lost interest in the project. The conversation can be read [here]!

I once got a reply from a Truecrypt developer in early 2013, when asking about the state of UEFI+GPT bootloader code too…

I just dug up that email from my archive, and the address contained the full name of the sender. And yes, it was a “David”. This could very well be the nail in the coffin. Sounds as if it was truly not the NSA this time around.