Jul 152015
 

XP x64 is dead logo[1] Update 2: It’s not looking good. At all. I (and some other users) have been playing around with Windows Storage Server 2003 systems (see the first update below), and while the OEMs are supposed to uphold support for the system, it seems they just don’t care. Two distributions have been inspected, one from Dell and one from Hewlett Packard. The latter actually does feature an updating software, that will however ignore all newer Microsoft security fixes. It just doesn’t do anything useful at all it seems.

For now, I am not even sure whether Microsoft truly ships any updates to the OEMs for rollout to customers, or whether they’ve just abandoned WSS03 completely, making their lifecycle statements regarding the operating system an empty promise, as no OEM could patch the OS itself like Microsoft can. It looks like we’re not getting anywhere with this. If you are a Windows Storage Server 2003 operator and you know more about this, or if you actually do have access to WSS03 Windows updates from after 2015-07-14, please do let me know in the comments! Thank you.

Update: While I’m not completely sure about it, it might be the case that we can disregard the text below this paragraph. A user that goes by the name of [tagg] pointed me towards a comment in the RyanVM forums, where 5eraph is releasing his XP x64 update packs. It seems that a special version of Windows Server 2003 called the “Windows Storage Server 2003” is actually supported until [October of 2016], which could mean that XP x64 could get yet another extension to its lifetime. I’m currently inspecting the operating system and methods to extract full update installers out of it to see whether it can truly be done. If yes, there might be life in the old dog yet!


The dark ages have finally arrived – for XP x64 users, that is. Yesterday, Microsofts extended support for Windows Server 2003 has ended, and with it also my [unofficial XP x64 update] project. There won’t be any more updates for Windows XP Professional x64 Edition SP2 and its on-board components from this day on. And while the regular 32-bit version with its older NT 5.1 kernel will live on until 2019 due to the [POSReady2009 hack], XP x64 will not, as there is no 64-bit embedded POSReady version of XP naturally, given that point-of-service systems like ticketing machines or airport terminals don’t need 64-bit address spaces.

So, as said on the update page, if you’re going to keep using XP x64, you’re doing so at your own risk. And you should really be knowing what you’re doing too, or you may not only put yourself at risk, but also other users on the web, should your machine become compromised. But given that XP x64 users I’ve encountered recently are also often freaks and avid Linux/UNIX users as well, I think the danger is much lower than with 32-bit XP.

Well that’s it. From the Microsoft side of things, this is pretty much where XP x64 ends.

It’s a bit sad that there is no free kernel API extension to make newer software run on the old system, like there is for Win9x with [KernelEx]. Software built with modern Microsoft development environments (Visual Studio 2013+) and in certain cases older ones will likely work on XP less and less from now on. People will no longer care so much for linking against the old platform SDKs and compiling for the v110_xp platform target.

Several free software projects (like FileZilla to name just one of many) have already ceased to support NT5.x even before the end of Server 2003. It’s even worse for commercial applications of course. Then there are others which still care to keep the platform supported, like the x265/HEVC encoder or closed software like AnyDVD HD.

But one thing’s for sure.

From this day on, it’ll only get darker and colder for those who decide to stay on this ship!

[1] Original image is © 2015 Windows 8 Wallpapers