Apr 022013
 

Frog ASPIToday I would like to discuss a few useful tricks for Windows XP x64. Yeah. Again. But this time around, it’s at least partially about stuff that you can’t easily find on the Internet anymore, whether it’s the information or the actual software part that’s missing. There are several software components that are sometimes hard to use or find for XP x64. Some are even hard to set up for regular 32-bit Windows XP. The following solutions will be discussed:

  • 1.) The ASPI Layer (digital media access)
  • 2.) UDF 2.5 (for Blu-Ray and HD-DVD access)
  • 3.) exFAT (some modern cameras etc. need this file system)
  • 4.) EXT2/3/4 (for Linux and UNIX compatibility)
  • 5.) Universal SSD TRIM (keep your SSD clean, tidy and fast, like on modern systems)

So, let’s start with #1:

1.) The ASPI layer:

Edit: Note that in the meantime, the FrogASPI solution described here is no longer the only option. Another one that works even for 64-bit applications accessing the ASPI layer has been found, see further below!

1.a) FrogASPI:

One of those things that have been abandoned by Microsoft is the ASPI layer, the Advanced SCSI Programming Interface. Meant as a way for digital storage media access it was most prominently used to read from optical drives digitally (also on ATA, not just SCSI), so you didn’t need to rip audio CDs via MSCDEX on Win98 or via the crappy analog link from your drive to the sound card. ASPI can also be used to access other types of storage devices, but this is the most important part. Some older software, like my beloved Xing AudioCatalyst (an ancient CD ripper including the Fraunhofer mp3 encoder) might still need ASPI to access audio CDs.

However, Adaptec stopped shipping ASPI drivers for Microsoft Windows after Microsoft had abandoned the API and introduced its own replacement called SPTI, the SCSI PassThrough Interface. As a matter of fact, you can still install Adaptecs ASPI layer on 32-Bit Windows XP, as it includes a working 32-Bit kernel driver. So for 32-Bit XP, it’s still fine. However, there is no such driver for XP x64 (and also not for 32/64-Bit Vista/7/8). So, no ASPI at all?

For a loong time I indeed had to live without it, until I found that french guy named Millenod (That’s his nick name, I will not disclose his real name) who had written a 100% userspace ASPI layer, that would work on any newer Windows operating system on x86, no matter the bitness. This is called FrogASPI, and unfortunately, Millenods website for it is down by now. In its core, it is actually just an SPTI wrapper. Back in those days, I even wrote the guy an email, thanking him for his work. Here is a part of his reply:

“FrogAspi is effectively an SPTI wrapper. I decided to work in “user” mode, instead of kernel ones, for many reasons.. It was for me the fastest way to implement a generic ASPI layer, which is not OS specific as drivers.”

-Millenod, Developer of FrogASPI

After renaming the FrogAspi.dll to the proper name wnaspi32.dll and putting it into %WINDIR%\SysWOW64\ for 64-Bit Windows, it can be used by any ASPI-enabled application. For 32-Bit Windows, please use %WINDIR%\system32! See, what Adaptecs own aspichk.exe has to say about what we just did:

Adaptec ASPI Check

You’ll see that some files are reported as missing. You do not have to care about that though, ASPI32.SYS would’ve been the 32-Bit kernel driver, WOWPOST.EXE is a 16-Bit Windows ASPI helper tool, WINASPI.DLL the corresponding 16-Bit Windows driver. None of those are needed. Now, that FrogASPI is mapping all ASPI calls to SPTI, we can begin to actively use it even on 64-Bit Windows. See AudioCatalyst for instance, with ASPI being available:

AudioCatalyst using FrogASPI

AudioCatalyst reading the Postal Original Soundtrack CD using FrogASPI

As you can see, everything works just fine. Oh, and besides, in case you want AudioCatalysts CDDB feature back (as shown in this screenshot), just add the following lines to your AudioCatalyst.ini, sitting in the programs installation folder, this’ll switch from the now-broken CDDB to FreeDB:

  1. CDDBServer=freedb.org
  2. CDDBHTTPPath=/~freedb/cddb.cgi
  3. CDDBLocation=Random FreeDB Site
  4. CDDBTCPIPPort=8880
  5. CDDBConnectVia=TCP/IP

You can download FrogASPI right here:

Unfortunately I cannot give you a download link for Xing AudioCatalyst, as it’s commercial software even today.

1.b) StarBurn ASPI (An update from 2016-12-05):

In the meantime, user Steve Sybesma has [commented] about a different solution provided by [StarBurn Software]. With their recording software comes a native ASPI layer for both 32-bit and 64-bit systems with full compatibility for even 64-bit programs that want to use ASPI. I decided to fetch the necessary DLLs from their SDK and release them in the form of a standalone InnoSetup installer for Windows 2000 and newer. The installer will auto-detect your operating systems’ bitness and will install the 32-bit ASPI layer on 32-bit systems as well as both the 32-bit as well as the 64-bit one on 64-bit systems.

Here it is:

It has been successfully tested on Windows 2000 Pro SP4, Windows XP Pro SP3, Windows XP Pro x64 Edition SP2 as well as Windows 10 Pro x64. If you don’t want to trust my installer, that’s fine as well of course. You can just install the StarBurn software from its original source, it should give you the same level of ASPI support, just with more additional stuff being installed!

Now, to #2, the UDF 2.5 file system for HD-DVDs and Blu-Rays:

2.) UDF 2.5:

Now this one was a real bitch. It took me months to finally get it nailed! UDF 2.5 is a file system. And it’s used for basically two type of media: HD-DVD discs and Blu-Ray discs, including the most modern 3D Blu-Rays. It just bugged me like hell, that I couldn’t access the discs as I normally would in Windows Explorer or on the command line. Windows XP simply does not have the proper file system kernel driver. And while it’s relatively easy to find one for 32-Bit WinXP, it’s immeasurably harder to find the single one existing driver for Windows XP x64. I’m not even sure if it still exists on the web..

One day I came across a person whose name I forgot, but that guy had searched the web for months just like me, and he found the driver just before it went offline. So he re-uploaded it, with his single file sharing link in some post on some unknown website being the only thing that saved my bacon. Maybe one day, somebody will find the XP x64 UDF 2.5 driver here on my site after desperate searching? Who knows.

So, the only existing driver has been developed by Panasonic/Matsushita, a company that also builds optical drives. It works on Windows XP x64 as well as Server 2003 x64. And here it is, together with the Toshiba-made UDF 2.5 driver for regular 32-Bit Windows XP just for completeness:

Again, I would like to emphasize that it took me months to find that freaking 64-Bit XP driver, I’m not even sure what Panasonic/Matsushita developed it for, but here it is for your enjoyment. After installation and reboot, you can browse a HD-DVD or Blu-Ray just like any CD or DVD disc, see here:

UDF 2.5 at work in XP x64

The Blu-Ray folder structure of the german uncut version of “The Boondock Saints”, viewed using the Panasonic/Matsushita UDF 2.5 driver for XP x64

And now, #3, the exFAT file system:

3.) exFAT:

exFAT is a successor to the older FAT32 file system that uses a 64-bit address field instead, allowing for larger than 4GB files, the most notorious limitation of regular FAT. exFAT is now being used on newer cameras and other handheld devices for memory card formatting. Since the comparably heavy-weight NTFS is typically not used on such devices, exFAT is the replacement we get. Also, exFAT is the official file system for SDXC and Memory Stick XC cards, so they may very well come exFAT-preformatted! The only sour part is, that exFAT is kind of proprietary (Microsoft), like NTFS. That’s a bit crappy, but well.

I have however already written an article about exFAT on XP x64, so I will just link to it. exFAT is also very easy to get for both 32-Bit and 64-Bit flavors of Windows XP:

And now, finally, some free file systems from the Linux world:

4.) EXT2/3/4:

EXT is one of the most widely if not the most widely used file system in the entire world of Linux. It has also been ported to other systems like BSD, Solaris or ReactOS. And also Windows actually, although the implementation is not the most seamless you can dream up. But still, you can get read/write access to all currently used EXT versions under Windows, even the fast new EXT4.

The software that I found most useful for this is called [ext2fsd], short for EXT2 file system driver. It comes with the actual driver plus a helper tool for mounting and for enabling write access. It would be nice to just be able to mount EXT filesystems seamlessly from the start, without having to use that mounting tool, but we’re not that far yet it seems. However, drives can be configured to auto-mount later, so you need the tool only once for each drive. Write access has to be enabled by hand.

Currently, ext2fsd supports the following systems: NT 5.0 (Windows 2000), NT 5.1 (Windows XP 32-Bit), NT 5.2 (Windows XP x64, Server 2003), NT 6.0 (Windows Vista), NT 6.1 (Windows 7, Server 2008). Where not explicitly mentioned, it supports both 32-Bit and 64-Bit versions of said operating systems. And here is what it looks like in action:

EXT4 mounted on XP x64

A Linux-created EXT4 filesystem mounted on XP x64 for read/write using ext2fsd

The only strange thing is, that ext2fsd calls the EXT4 file system “EXT3”. It shouldn’t. But other than that, it works just fine. I haven’t tested a lot of r/w, but so far it worked fine, without any corruption or anything. The helper tool also gives you a function for flushing the write cache, and a nice statistics window for monitoring the file system usage while mounted. It also allows the user to manually unmount of course. Even mkfs is there, so you can format drives as EXT under Windows, the only useful tool missing would be fsck for checking & repairing such filesystems. But you can’t have everything I guess.

So, usage is not as seamless as it would be with native NTFS/FAT32/exFAT drivers, but it’s ok and it greatly boosts the Linux interoperability of XP x64 and other Windows systems. Also, EXT filesystems can easily be used in other UNIX-style systems like Solaris, BSD or MacOS X, so this allows a lot of different systems to exchange data easily using removable sticks or harddrives. Since it of course supports large files (>4GB) and it’s more easy to handle across a wide spectrum of operating systems, unlike exFAT it might one day become the #1 choice for data exchange, replacing FAT32 and NTFS in that field. However, today, NTFS on Linux is probably a lot more widespread than this EXT driver on Windows, so there is still a long way to go.

Of course, there is a downside to this too: All the POSIX permissions like ownership, read/write/execute bits etc. just do not work on Windows. You can neither read nor write any such meta data using ext2fsd. I have neither checked the umask that ext2fsd uses yet, nor what ownership it sets, but I would guess it’s root:root with permissions 777 or rwxrwxrwx. But whatever it is, you will most likely need to take care of that when mounting on your UNIX-style system.

I hope this was helpful, if you have any comments about these helpful add-ons, just post away!

5.) Universal SSD TRIM:

This is a 2014-11-03 edit of the original article.

Usually, I would tell users who would like to use an SSD on Windows XP or XP x64 to re-align their partitions with a [gparted ISO] after installation to get proper alignment, and more importantly to use either Intel, Corsair or Samsung SSDs so that they can TRIM their SSDs properly using their respective manufacturers’ XP-compatible software tools, maintaining full write speed over the entire life time of the SSD drive.

It seems that I can now finally confirm, that the latter criterion no longer needs to be met. Basically, I found an easy way to TRIM any SSD on Windows XP or Windows XP x64, as long as the following logical criteria are met:

  • The SSD itself needs to support TRIM. Well, that was obvious.
  • The controller driver needs to support TRIM. Now I can’t speak for just any driver, but I have tested this on Intels ICH10-R and an ancient ICH7-M, both worked just fine with AHCI drivers installed. Usually, AHCI is what you want. Avoid IDE/legacy PATA modes. You may need to configure this properly in your systems BIOS and you may need to retrofit AHCI drivers in XP if your system was installed using IDE mode to avoid bluescreens on boot. If you need help doing that, please ask away in the comments.

So, what’s the solution? It’s called the ADATA SSD Toolbox! Basically, ADATA developers seem to have forgot or were actually never instructed to install an artificial vendor obstruction inside their software. So what they did was to write an SSD toolbox that just complies to the SATA standard, implementing its TRIM command for any compatible SSD, no-holds-barred! I have tested this on an Intel 320 SSD, as well as on a Crucial m500 SSD now, despite no official XP support being present:

So there you go! Now pretty much any TRIM capable SSD can be made to accept TRIM on Windows XP and XP x64! Together with gparted for partition alignment, we have a full-featured SSD solution for XP, leaving nothing to be desired!

Download the ADATA SSD Toolbox here: [ADATA SSD Toolbox v2.0.1].

Aug 202012
 

exFATMost of us will know the Microsoft FAT16 and FAT32 filesystems that have been in use most prominently with Windows 9x/Me operating systems, and if you’re an old guy you might also know FAT12 used for floppy disks. Today, the former two are still widely used to exchange data between heterogenous operating systems (Windows/Unix/Linux/MacOS/BSD..) and also to exchange data between computers and media devices such as digital cameras, music players, cellphones etc. But the formatters of Windows usually don’t allow the formatting of storage devices larger than 32GB with FAT32 (although it’s possible and also readable in Windows). Also, FAT32 has harsh limitations in the regards of maximum file size (4GB) and access control lists (none).

Hence, FAT64, or “exFAT”. Why is this even important you might ask? Because the file system is in the specification of SDXC and MSXC flash cards used for cameras and camcorders, as well as many other devices like set-top boxes. Not that you couldn’t format it with something else on Linux, but spec is spec.

So I tried to get exFAT to work on Windows XP Professional x64 Edition using Microsofts official update [KB955704], which is available not only for XP x64, but also regular XP, Server 2003 and Server 2003 for IA64/Itanium. I first tried it with a 1GB flash card, a Sony MemoryStick actually, and with a 120GB USB HDD, which showed a little problem appearing with NTFS format options when this update is installed. Also, the announced ACL support seems to just not be there with this update. There are no security-related options at all.. See a series of screenshots with exFAT in use:

So there you can see, that the NTFS option disappears for a removable USB HDD larger than 32GB as soon as exFAT is installed. Previously, FAT32 wouldn’t be allowed, so Microsoft simply had to make NTFS available for such a drive as the single remaining FS. Now that we’ve got exFAT, NTFS is forbidden, even on the console with format.exe! Well, almost forbidden. They haven’t thought it all the way through though, so you can still do an NTFS format in disk management in the administrative tools. There, you’ll never see any exFAT option anyway, it’s simply not implemented. Talk about consistency, eh? For large fixed disks, as also shown in the screenshots, both NTFS and exFAT are now available.

Now the other problem is that while files >4GB now work perfectly fine due to 64-Bit address space (which is very good!), the announced ACL support is obviously not implemented here. You can’t set an owner, you can’t set read/write/execute permissions or anything. In that case it behaves just like any FAT on Windows would, which is a bit disappointing. It might be, that if you connect an exFAT volume with ACLs to such a machine, the exFAT kernel driver would just silently ignore all kinds of implemented ACLs, like a cracked driver.

At least, with this driver you will get support for all new flash card formats, so if you want to go on with XP or XP x64, you can still use your fancy new cameras SDXC or MSXC card without having to play tricks on it and format it with FAT32 outside of Windows. That alone is nice enough I have to admit! And it’s even an official driver from Microsoft, not some Panasonic or Matsushita 3rd party driver like with the UDF 2.5 filesystem for Blu-Rays!

I also got this to work on CentOS Linux now, using the fuse system (user-space fs driver). To build fuse-exFAT, you need GCC, scons, fuse-devel/libfuse-dev and subversion. You can get the driver and utility sourcecode [here], along with some binaries for a few systems .