Aug 032016
 

xmms logoYeah, I’m still using the good old xmms v1 on Linux and UNIX. Now, the boxes I used to play music on were all 32-bit x86 so far. Just some old hardware. Recently I tried to play some of my [AAC-LC] files on my 64-bit Linux workstation, and to my surprise, it failed to play the file, giving me the error Pulse coding not allowed in short blocks when started from the shell (just so I can read the error output).

I thought this had to have something to do with my file and not the player, so I tried .aac files with ADTS headers instead of audio packed into an mp4/m4a container. The result was the same. Also, the encoding (SBR/VBR or even HE-AAC, which sucks for music anyway) didn’t make a difference. Then I found [this post] on the Gentoo forums, showing that the problem was really the architecture. 32-bit builds wouldn’t fail, but the source code of the [libfaad2] decoding library of xmms’ mp4 plugin wasn’t ready for 64-bit.

xmms’ xmms_mp4Plugin-0.4 comes with a pretty old libfaad2, 2.0 or something. I will show you how to upgrade that to version 2.7, which is fixed for x86_64 (Readily fixed source code is also provided at the bottom). We’ll also fix up other parts of that plugin so it can compile using more modern versions of GCC and clang, and my test platform for this would be a rather conservative CentOS 6.8 Linux. First, get the source code:

I’m assuming you already have xmms installed, otherwise obtain version 1.2.11 from [here]!

Step 1, libfaad2:

Unpack both archives from above, then enter the mp4 plugins’ source directory. You’ll find a libfaad2/ directory in there. Delete or move it and all of its contents. From the faad2 source tree, copy the directory libfaad/ from there to libfaad2/ in the plugins’ directory, replacing the deleted one. Now that’s the source, but we also need the updated headers so that the xmms plugin can link against the newer libfaad2. To do that, copy the two files include/faad.h and include/neaacdec.h from the faad2 2.7 source tree to the directory include/ in the plugin source tree. Overwrite faad.h if prompted.

Step 2, libmp4v2:

Also, the bundled libmp4v2 of the mp4 plugin is very old and broken on modern systems due to code issues. Let’s fix them, so back to the mp4 plugin source tree. We need to fix some invalid pure specifiers in the following files: libmp4v2/mp4property.h, libmp4v2/mp4property.cpp, libmp4v2/rtphint.h and libmp4v2/rtphint.cpp.

To do so, open them in a text editor and search and replace all occurences of = NULL with = 0. This will fix all assignments and comparisons that would otherwise break. When using vi or vim, you can do :%s/=\sNULL/= 0/g for this.

On top of that, we need to fix a invalid const char* to char* conversion in libmp4v2/rtphint.cpp as well. Open it, and hop to line number 325, you’ll see this:

  1. char* pSlash = strchr(pRtpMap, '/');

Replace it with this:

  1. const char* pSlash = strchr(pRtpMap, '/');

And we’re done!

Now, in the mp4 plugins’ source root directory, run $ ./bootstrap && ./configure. Hopefully, no errors will occur. If all is ok, run $ make. Given you have xmms 1.2.11 installed, it should compile and link fine now. Last step: # make install.

This has been tested with my current GCC 4.4.7 platform compiler as well as GCC 4.9.3 on CentOS 6.8 Linux. Also, it has been tested with clang 3.4.1 on FreeBSD 10.3 UNIX, also x86_64. Please note that FreeBSD 10.3 needs extensive modifications to its build tools as well, so I can’t provide fixed source for this. However, packages on FreeBSD have already been fixed in that regard, so you can just # pkg install xmms-faad2 and it’s done anyway. This is likely the case for several modern Linux distros as well.

Let’s play:

xmms playing AAC-LC Freebsd 10.3 UNIX on x86_64

Yeah, it works. In this case on FreeBSD.

And the shell would say:

2-MPEG-4 AAC Low Complexity profile
MP4 - 2 channels @ 44100 Hz

Perfect! And here is the [fixed source code] upgraded with libfaad2 2.7, so you don’t have to do anything by yourself other than $ ./bootstrap && ./configure && make and # make install! Ah, actually I’m not so sure whether xmms itself builds fine on CentOS 6.8 from source these days… Maybe I’ll check that out another day. ;)

Feb 062012
 

config.mak with ldflagsOn Friday I tried to compile, install and run x264 with libav support strictly with user privileges on Linux, so no root, no write permissions to /usr/lib, /usr/include, /usr/bin or whatever. I thought this was going to be tricky and I have never done that before. But if I get that access to that Itanium² machine on our university, I need to be able to do that to install x264 without any root privileges. So what you need to do is add -L and -I options to your CFLAGS and CXXFLAGS environment variables to make the GNU C and C++ compilers search for headers and libraries in specific subdirectories in your users home directory. So I created a ~/build folder, and first built libav using the configure option --prefix=~/build. The flags on my test machine were like this:

$ export CFLAGS="-march=native -O3 -ffast-math -mssse3 -pipe -L~/build/lib -I~/build/include"
$ export CXXFLAGS="-march=native -O3 -ffast-math -mssse3 -pipe -L~/build/lib -I~/build/include"

But that alone is not enough…  Continue reading »