Nov 222016
 

FreeBSD IBM ServeRAID Manager logoAnd yet another FreeBSD-related post: After [updating] the IBM ServeRAID manager on my old Windows 2000 server I wanted to run the management software on any possible client. Given it’s Java stuff, that shouldn’t be too hard, right? Turned out not to be too easy either. Just copying the .jar file over to Linux and UNIX and running it like $ java -jar RaidMan.jar wouldn’t do the trick. Got nothing but some exception I didn’t understand. I wanted to have it work on XP x64 (easy, just use the installer) and Linux (also easy) as well as FreeBSD. But there is no version for FreeBSD?!

The ServeRAID v9.30.21 manager only supports the following operating systems:

  • SCO OpenServer 5 & 6
  • SCO Unixware 7.1.3 & 7.1.4
  • Oracle Solaris 10
  • Novell NetWare 6.5
  • Linux (only certain older distributions)
  • Windows (2000 or newer)

I started by installing the Linux version on my CentOS 6.8 machine. It does come with some platform-specific libraries as well, but those are for running the actual RAID controller management agent for interfacing with the driver on the machine running the ServeRAID controller. But I only needed the user space client program, which is 100% Java stuff. All I needed was the proper invocation to run it! By studying IBMs RaidMan.sh, I came up with a very simple way of launching the manager on FreeBSD by using this script I called serveraid.sh (Java is required naturally):

  1. #!/bin/sh
  2.  
  3. # ServeRAID Manager launcher script for FreeBSD UNIX
  4. # written by GAT. http://www.xin.at/archives/3967
  5. # Requirements: An X11 environment and java/openjdk8-jre
  6.  
  7. curDir="$(pwd)"
  8. baseDir="$(dirname $0)/"
  9.  
  10. mkdir ~/.serveraid 2>/dev/null
  11. cd ~/.serveraid/
  12.  
  13. java -Xms64m -Xmx128m -cp "$baseDir"RaidMan.jar com.ibm.sysmgt.raidmgr.mgtGUI.Launch \
  14. -jar "$baseDir"RaidMan.jar $* < /dev/null >> RaidMan_StartUp.log 2>&1
  15.  
  16. mv ~/RaidAgnt.pps ~/RaidGUI.pps ~/.serveraid/
  17. cd "$curDir"

Now with that you probably still can’t run everything locally (=in a FreeBSD machine with ServeRAID SCSI controller) because of the Linux libraries. I haven’t tried running those components on linuxulator, nor do I care for that. But what I can do is to launch the ServeRAID manager and connect to a remote agent running on Linux or Windows or whatever is supported.

Now since this server/client stuff probably isn’t secure at all (no SSL/TLS I think), I’m running this through an SSH tunnel. However, the Manager refuses to connect to a local port because “localhost” and “127.0.0.1” make it think you want to connect to an actual local RAID controller. It would refuse to add such a host, because an undeleteable “local machine” is always already set up to begin with, and that one won’t work with an SSH tunnel as it’s probably not running over TCP/IP. This can be circumvented easily though!

Open /etc/hosts as root and enter an additional fantasy host name for 127.0.0.1. I did it like that with “xin”:

::1			localhost localhost.my.domain xin
127.0.0.1		localhost localhost.my.domain xin

Now I had a new host “xin” that the ServeRAID manager wouldn’t complain about. Now set up the SSH tunnel to the target machine, I put that part into a script /usr/local/sbin/serveraidtunnel.sh. Here’s an example, 34571 is the ServeRAID agents’ default TCP listen port, 10.20.15.1 shall be the LAN IP of our remote machine hosting the ServeRAID array:

#!/bin/bash
ssh -fN -p22 -L34571:10.20.15.1:34571 mysshuser@www.myserver.com

You’d also need to replace “mysshuser” with your user name on the remote machine, and “www.myserver.com” with the Internet host name of the server via which you can access the ServeRAID machine. Might be the same machine or a port forward to some box within the remote LAN.

Now you can open the ServeRAID manager and connect to the made-up host “xin” (or whichever name you chose), piping traffic to and from the ServeRAID manager through a strongly encrypted SSH tunnel:

IBM ServeRAID Manager on FreeBSD

It even detects the local systems’ operating system “FreeBSD” correctly!

And:

IBM ServeRAID Manager on FreeBSD

Accessing a remote Windows 2000 server with a ServeRAID II controller through an SSH tunnel, coming from FreeBSD 11.0 UNIX

IBM should’ve just given people the RaidMan.jar file with a few launcher scripts to be able to run it on any operating system with a Java runtime environment, whether Windows, or some obscure UNIX flavor or something else entirely, just for the client side. Well, as it stands, it ain’t as straight-forward as it may be on Linux or Windows, but this FreeBSD solution should work similarly on other systems as well, like e.g. Apple MacOS X or HP-UX and others. I tested this with the Sun JRE 1.6.0_32, Oracle JRE 1.8.0_112 and OpenJDK 1.8.0_102 for now, and even though it was originally built for Java 1.4.2, it still works just fine.

Actually, it works even better than with the original JRE bundled with RaidMan.jar, at least on MS Windows (no more GUI glitches).

And for the easy way, here’s the [package]! Unpack it wherever you like, maybe in /usr/local/. On FreeBSD, you need [archivers/p7zip] to unpack it and a preferably modern Java version, like [java/openjdk8-jre], as well as X11 to run the GUI. For easy binary installation: # pkg install p7zip openjdk8-jre. To run the manager, you don’t need any root privileges, you can execute it as a normal user, maybe like this:

$ /usr/local/RaidMan/serveraid.sh

Please note that my script will create your ServeRAID configuration in ~/.serveraid/, so if you want to run it as a different user or on a different machine later on, you should recursively copy that directory to the new user/machine. That’ll retain the local client configuration.

That should do it! :)

Nov 212016
 

IBM ServeRAID Manager logoBelieve it or not, the server hosting the very web site you’re reading right now has all of its data stored on an ancient IBM ServeRAID II array made in the year 1995. That makes the SCSI RAID-5 controller 21 years old, and the 9.1GB SCA drives attached to it via hot-plug bays are from 1999, so 17 years old. Recently, I found out that IBMs’ latest SCSI ServeRAID manager from 2011 still supports that ancient controller as well as the almost equally ancient Windows 2000 Server I’m running on the machine. In hope for better management functionality, I chose to give the new software a try. So additionally to my antiquated NT4 ServeRAID manager v2.23.3 I’d also run v9.30.21 side-by-side! This is also in preparation for a potential upgrade to a much newer ServeRAID-4H and larger SCSI drives.

Just so you know how the old v2.23.3 looks, here it is:

IBM ServeRAID Manager v2.23.3

IBM ServeRAID Manager v2.23.3

It really looks like 1996-1997 software? It can do the most important tasks, but there are two major drawbacks:

  1. It can’t notify me of any problems via eMail
  2. It’s a purely standalone software, meaning no server/client architecture => I have to log in via KVM-over-IP or SSH+VNC to manage it

So my hope was that the new software would have a server part and a detachable client component as well as the ability to send eMails whenever shit happens. However, when first launching the new ServeRAID manager, I was greeted with this:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 GUI failure

Now this doesn’t look right… (click to enlarge)

Note that this was my attempt to run the software on Windows XP x64. On Windows 2000, it looked a bit better, but still somewhat messed up. Certain GUI elements would pop up upon mouseover, but overall, the program just wasn’t usable. After finding out that this is Java software being executed by a bundled and ancient version of Sun Java (v1.4.2_12), i just tried to run the RaidMan.jar file with my platform Java. On XP x64 that’s the latest and greatest Java 1.8u112 (even though the installer says it needs a newer operating system this seems to work just fine) and on Windows 2000 it’s the latest supported on that OS: Java 1.6u31. To make RaidMan.jar run on a different JRE on Windows, you can just alter the shortcut the installer creates for you:

Changing the JRE that ServeRAID Manager should be executed by

Changing the JRE that ServeRAID Manager should be executed by

Here it’s run by the javaw.exe command that an old JDK 1.7.0 installer created in %WINDIR%\system32\. It was only later that I changed it to 1.8u112. After changing the JRE to a more modern one, everything magically works:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21, logged in

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21, remotely logged in to my server (click to enlarge)

And this is already me having launched the Manager component on a different machine on my LAN, connecting to the ServeRAID agent service running on my server. So that part works. Since this software also runs on Linux and FreeBSD UNIX, I can set up a proper SSH tunnel script to access it remotely and securely from the outside world as well. Yay! Clicking on the controller gave me this:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 array overview

Array overview (click to enlarge)

Ok, this reminds me of Adaptecs’/ICPs’ StorMan, and since there is some Adaptec license included on the IBM Application CD that this version came from, it might very well be practically the same software. It does show warnings on all drives, while the array and volume are “ok”. The warnings are pretty negligible though, as you can already see above, let’s have a more detailed look:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 disk warranty warnings

So I have possible non-warranted drives? No shit, sherlock! Most of them are older than the majority of todays’ Internet users… I still don’t get how 12 of these drives are still running, seriously… (click to enlarge)

So that’s not really an issue. But what about eMail notifications? Well, take a look:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 notification options

It’s there! (click to enlarge)

Yes! It can notify to the desktop, to the system log and to various email recipients. Also, you can choose who gets which mails by selecting different log levels for different recipients. The only downside is, that the ServeRAID manager doesn’t allow for SSL/TLS connections to mail servers and it can’t even provide any login data. As such, you need your own eMail server on your local network, that allows for unauthenticated and unencrypted SMTP access from the IP of your ServeRAID machine. In my case, no problem, so I can now get eMail notifications to my home and work addresses, as well as an SMS by using my 3G providers’ eMail-2-SMS gateway!

On top of that, you can of course check out disk and controller status as well:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 disk status

Disk status – not much to see here at all (on none of the tabs), probably because the old ServeRAID II can’t do S.M.A.R.T. Maybe good that it can’t, I don’t really want to see 17 year old hard drives’ S.M.A.R.T. logs anyway. ;)

 

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 controller status

Status of my ServeRAID II controller, no battery backup unit attached for the 4MB EDO-DRAM write cache and no temperature sensors present, so not much to see here either.

Now there is only one problem with this and that is that the new ServeRAID agent service consumes quite a lot of CPU power in the background, showing as 100% peaks on a single CPU core every few seconds. This is clearly visible in my web-based monitoring setup:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 agent CPU load

The background service is a bit too CPU hungry for my taste (Pentium Pro™ 200MHz). The part left of the “hole” is before installation, the part right of it after installation.

And in case you’re wondering what that hole is right between about 20:30 and 22:00, that’s the ServeRAID Managers’ SNMP components which killed my Microsoft SNMP services upon installation. My network and CPU monitoring solution is based on SNMP though, so that was not good. Luckily, just restarting the SNMP services fixed it. However, as you can see, one of the slow 200MHz cores is now under much higher load. I don’t like that because I’m short on CPU power all the time anyway, but I’ll leave it alone for now, let’s see how it goes.

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 splash screen

“Fast configuration”, but a pretty slow background service… :roll:

Now all I need to get is a large pack of large SCA SCSI drives, since I still have that much faster [ServeRAID 4H] with 128MB SDRAM cache and BBU lying around for 3 years anyway! Ah, and as always, the motivation to actually upgrade the server. ;)

Edit: It turns out I found the main culprit for the high CPU load. It seems to be IBMs’ [SNMP sub-agent component] after all, the one that also caused my SNMP service to shut down upon installation. Uninstalling the ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 and reinstalling it with the SNMP component deselected resulted in a different load profile. See the following graph, the vertical red line separates the state before (with SNMP sub-agent) from the state after (without SNMP sub-agent). Take a look at the magenta line depicting the CPU core that the RAID service was bound to:

ServeRAID Manager v9.30.21 with reduced CPU load

Disabling the ServeRAID managers’ SNMP sub-agent lowers the CPU load significantly!

Thanks fly out to [these guys at Ars Technica] for giving me the right idea!

Mar 192013
 

SCSI LVD/SE logoMy [servers]German flag web, SQL and mail directories are all sitting on a RAID-5 array hosted by an ancient IBM ServeRAID II controller that delivers 10MB/s at most. Using a very old 33MHz PowerPC 403GCX as its XOR processor and only 4MB of cache, what could one expect? Also, most stuff is cached in RAM anyway, so there isn’t much hurt.

Still, there is a guy that is currently selling much more powerful IBM ServeRAID 4H controllers on ebay, fully equipped with 128MB cache and battery backup unit. Who knows if the batteries still work, but nonetheless, for 10€ it’s just dirt cheap, so I got one. The auction is hosted in germany, see [this link]German flag! That one is 64-Bit 66MHz PCI and doesn’t quite fit into my older server (from a style perspective), also it features U160 SCSI, whereas my backplanes are only UW SCSI. So 160MB/s versus 40MB/s. But still, If I can max out the bus system of those backplanes, it’s going to be quite a boost anyway. And that should very well be possible given the far more powerful 266MHz PowerPC 750 XOR processor on this controller.

Also, the ServeRAID 4H features a pretty majestic appearance, full length and all, just need to add the bracket at the end of the card so it will sit properly in my server:

Now there is just one thing that remains unclear, and that’s whether my server will even be able to run the card. First I’ll test it in another machine anyway, to check for basic 32-Bit 33MHz PCI support. Unfortunately I can only test for PCI 2.1, whereas my server uses ancient 2.0. But we’ll see. It’s going to be quite some time before I’ll try it in my server anyway.