Jun 052015
 

Taranis RAID-6 logoAfter [part 1] we now get to the second part of the Taranis RAID-6 array and its host machine. This time we’ll focus on the Areca controller fan modification or as I say “Noctuafication”, the real power supply instead of the dead mockup shown before and a modification of it (not the electronics, I won’t touch PSU electronics!) plus the new CPU cooler, which has been designed by a company which sits in my home country, Austria. It’s Noctuas most massive CPU cooler produced to this date, the NH-D15. Also, we’ll see some new filters applied to the side part of the case, and we’ll take a look at the cable management, which was a job much more nasty than it looks.

Now, let’s get to it and have a look at what was done to the Areca controller:

So as you can see above, the stock heatsink & fan unit was removed. Reason being that it emits a very high-pitched, loud noise, which just doesn’t fit into the new machine which creates more like a low-pitched “wind” sound. In my old box, which features a total of 19 40×40mm fans you wouldn’t hear the card, but now it’s becoming a disturbance.

Note that when doing this, the Arecas fan alarm needs to be disabled. What the controller does due to lack of a rpm signal cable is to measure the fan’s “speed” by measuring its power consumption. Now the original fan is a 12V DC 0.09A unit, whereas the Noctua only needs 0.06A, thus triggering the controllers audible alarm. In my case not so troublesome. Even if it would fail – which is highly unlikely for a Noctua in its first 10 years or so – there are still the two 120mm side fans.

Cooling efficiency is slightly lower now, with the temperature of the dual-core 1.2GHz PowerPC 476FP CPU going from ~60°C to ~65°C, but that’s still very much ok. The noise? Pretty much gone!

Now, to the continued build:

So there it is, although not yet with final hardware all around. In any case, even with all that storage goodness sitting in there, the massive Noctua NH-D15 simply steals the show here. That Xeon X5690 will most definitely never encounter any thermal issues! And while the NH-D15 doesn’t come with any S1366 mounting kit, Noctua will send you one NM-I3 for free, if you email them your mainboard or CPU receipt as well as the NH-D15 receipt to prove you own the hardware. Pretty nice!

In total we can see that cooler, the ASUS P6T Deluxe mainboard, the 6GB RAM that are just there for testing, the Areca ARC-1883ix-12, a Creative Soundblaster X-Fi XtremeMusic, and one of my old EVGA GTX580 3GB Classified cards. On the top right of the first shot you can also spot the slightly misaligned Areca flash backup module again.

While all my previous machines were in absolute chaos, I wanted to have this ONE clean build in my life, so there it is. For what’s inside in terms of cables, very little can be seen really. Considering 12 SAS lanes, 4 SATA cables, tons of power cables and extensions, USB+FW cables, fan cables, an FDD cable, 12 LED cathode traces bundled into 4 cables for the RAID status/error LEDs and I don’t know what else. Also, all the internal headers are used up. 4 × USB for the front panel, one for the combo drives’ card reader and one for the Corsair Link USB dongle of the power supply, plus an additional mini-Firewire connector at the rear.

Talking about the cabling, I found it nearly impossible to even close the rear lid of the tower, because the Great Cthulhu was literally sitting back there. It may not look like it, but it took me many hours to get it under some control:

Cable chaos under control

That’s a ton of cables. The thingy in the lower right is a Corsair Link dongle bridging the PSUs I²C header to USBXPress, so you can monitor the power supply in MS Windows.

Now it can be closed without much force at least! Lots of self-adhesive cable clips and some pads were used here, but that’s just necessary to tie everything down, otherwise it just won’t work at all. Two fan cables and resistors are sitting there unused, as the fans were re-routed to the mainboard headers instead, but everything else you can see here is actually necessary and in use.

Now, let’s talk about the power supply. You may have noticed it already in the pictures above, but this Corsair AX1200i doesn’t look like it should. Indeed, as said, I modified it with an unneeded fan grill I took out of the top of the Lian Li case. Reason is, that this way you can’t accidentally drop any screws into the PSU when working on the machine, and that can happen very quickly. If you miss just one, you’re in for one nasty surprise when turning the machine on! Thanks fly out to [CryptonNite]German flag, who gave me that idea. Of course you could just turn the PSU around and let it suck in air from the floor (The Lian Li PC-A79B supports this), but I don’t want to have to tend to the bottom dust filter all the time. So here’s what it looks like:

A modfied Corsair Professional Series Platinum AX1200i.

A modfied Corsair Professional Series Platinum AX1200i. Screws are no danger anymore!

With 150W of power at +5V, this unit should also be good enough for driving all that HDD drive electronics. Many powerful PSUs ignore that part largely and only deliver a lot at +12V for CPUs, graphics cards etc. Fact is, for hard drives you still need a considerable amount of 5V power! Looking at Seagates detailed specifications for some of the newer enterprise drives, you can see a peak current of 1.45A @ 5V in a random write scenario, which means 1.45A × 5V = 7.25W per disk, or 12 × 7.25W = 87W total for 12 drives. That, plus USB requiring +5V and some other stuff. So with 150W I should be good. Exactly the power that my beloved old Tagan PipeRock 1300W PSU also provided on that rail.

Now, as for the side panels:

And one more, an idea I got from an old friend of mine, [Umlüx]Austrian Flag. Since I might end up with a low pressure case with more air being blown out rather than sucked in, dust may also enter through every other unobstructed hole, and I can’t have that! So we shut everything out using duct tape and paper inlets (a part of which you have maybe seen on the power supply closeup already):

The white parts are all paper with duct tape behind it. The paper is there so that the sticky side of the tape doesn't attract dust, which would give the rear a very ugly look otherwise. As you can see, everything is shut tight, even the holes of the controller card. No entry for dust here!

The white parts are all paper with duct tape behind it. The paper is there so that the sticky side of the tape doesn’t attract dust, which would give the rear a very ugly look otherwise. As you can see, everything is shut tight, even the holes of the controller card. No entry for dust here!

That’s it for now, and probably for a longer time. The next thing is really going to be the disks, and since I’m going for 6TB 4Kn enterprise disks, it’s going to be terribly expensive. And that alone is not the only problem.

First we got the weak Euro now, which seems to be starting to hurt disk drive imports, and then there is this crazy storage “tax” (A literal translation would be “blank media compensation”) that we’re getting in October after years of debate about it in my country. The tax is basically supposed to cover the monetary loss of artists due to legal private recordings from radio or TV stations to storage media. The tax will affect every device that features any kind of storage device, whether mechanical/magnetic, optical or flash. That means individual disks, SSDs, blank DVDs/BDs, USB pendrives, laptops, desktop machines, cellphones and tablets, pretty much everything. Including enterprise class SAS drives.

Yeah, talk about some crazy and stupid “punish everybody across the board for what only a few do”! Thanks fly out to the Austro Mechana (“AUME”, something like “GEMA” in Germany) and their fat-ass friends for that. Collecting societies… legal, institutionalized, large-scale crime if you ask me.

But that means that I’m in between a rock and a hard place. What I need to do is to find the sweet spot between the idiot tax and the Euros currency rate, taking natural price decline into account as well. So it’s going to be very hard to pick the right time to buy those drives. And as I am unwilling to step down to much cheaper 512e consumer – or god forbid shingled magnetic recording – drives with read error rates as high as <1 in 1014 bits, we’re talking ~6000€ here at current prices. Since it’s 12 drives, even a small price drop will already have great effect.

We’ll see whether I’ll manage to make a good decision on that front. Also, space on my current array is getting less and less by the week, which is yet another thing I need to keep my eyes on.

Edit: [Part 3 is now ready]!