Jan 152016
 

qWebIRC logoWhen I had set XINs web chat up back in 2014, I thought I’d found the holy grail of free IRC web frontends, but that wasn’t quite the case. While it worked, it wasn’t overly stable, and its GUI was a pretty crappy high-load HTML5/JavaScript part that didn’t work in a lot of browsers. It was based on the “kind of pre-alpha” [webchat2], a project which was dropped somewhere in the middle of the development process.

The biggest issue however was, that when a user was idle for like 5-10 minutes, webchat2 would drop his IRC connection in the backend without telling the user. So while the user kept thinking “oh, nobody is saying anything”, people might have continued to talk without him seeing it. The error became apparent only if the affected user started to write something again, which is when the “connection lost”-or-something message appeared.

Webchat, joined a channel

webchat2 – It looks nice, but it doesn’t really work that well.

It seems that software was bad at maintaining persistent connections for extended periods of time.

Back then I had tried several other alternatives, but most are based on [node.js], which my ancient Windows 2000 server (yeah yeah, I know) cannot run. I did stumble over the Python-based [qWebIRC] back then, but for some reason I had probably failed to install it properly. That piece was developed by the [QuakeNet] guys, who’re running it on their own site as well.

Yesterday I decided to give it another shot, and well…

qWebIRC login

The minimalistic qWebIRC login screen. “LunaticNet” isn’t really an IRC network though, it’s just the XIN.at IRC server by itself…

I wanted it perfect as well, so I aimed at fulfilling all the dependencies, which are:

  • Some IRC server (Duh! I won’t cover that part in detail here, but I’m running UnrealIRCd).
  • Python 2.5.x, 2.6.x or 2.7.x (obviously, and keep in mind that it won’t work with any Python 3.x).
  • zope.interface (a contract-based programming interface required by Twisted).
  • Twisted (for event-driven networking, something IRC needs to push stuff  happening on the IRC server to the web frontend).
  • pyWin32 (to enable Python to interface with the Win32 APIs).
  • simplejson (optional; preferably a version including its C extensions, provides a performance boost).
  • pyOpenSSL (optional; required if you wish to connect to IRC+SSL servers and/or to host the web chat via HTTPS instead of HTTP).
  • Java (optional; used for JavaScript minify during compile time. Makes the JS much smaller to save bandwidth).
  • Mercurial (optional; fast versioning system, provides a qWebIRC performance boost for some reason I don’t quite get yet).
  • instsrv & srvany (optional; Used to create a Windows system service for qWebIRC).

Now that’s quite something, and given that I’m doing this on Windows 2000, there have to be compromises. While the latest Python 2.7.11 can work on Win2k, the installer will fail. 2.7.3 is the last which works “cleanly”. You can still install 2.7.11 on a modern Windows box and then just copy it over, but then you won’t have it registered in the OS. In any case, I decided to go with the much older Python 2.5.4, also because some of the modules listed above including machine code were nowhere to be found for Python 2.7.x in a pre-compiled state.

So, some software is brand-new (from 2016 even), and other parts not so much. I tried to use the newest possible software without having to compile any machine code myself (like the C extensions of simplejson), because that would’ve been a lot of work.

I packaged everything I picked for this into one archive for you to use, here it is:

What you get are the following versions:

  • qWebIRC #516de557ddc7
  • Python v2.5.4
  • zope.interface v3.8.0
  • Twisted v12.1.0
  • pyWin32 v220
  • simplejson v2.1.1 with C extensions
  • pyOpenSSL v0.13.12 built by egenix
  • Sun Java Runtime Environment v1.6u31
  • Mercurial v3.4.2

And that’s what it looks like when it’s up and running:

qWebIRC chat

What qWebIRC looks like for a user logged into the XIN.at IRC server.

Now how do you install this? Simply follow these step-by-step instructions:

  1. Install Python 2.5.4. Make sure python.exe is in your systems search path. If it isn’t, add it.
  2. Copy the zope\ folder from the zope.interface 3.8.0 to the Lib\ subdirectory of your Python 2.5 installation, so that it looks like: C:\Program Files\Python25\Lib\zope\. Make sure the user who will run qWebIRC has sufficient permissions on the folder.
  3. Install Twisted 12.1.0.
  4. Install pyWin32 220
  5. Install simplejson 2.1.1
  6. Install egenix’ pyOpenSSL 0.13.12.
  7. Install Java 1.6u31. Make sure to disable auto-updates in the system control panel and disable the browser plugins for security reasons. Java is only needed for JavaScript code compression when compiling qWebIRC and for nothing else!
  8. Install Mercurial 3.4.2.
  9. Copy qWebIRC to a target directory, copy config.py.example to config.py and configure qWebIRC to your liking by editing config.py.
  10. When done, open a cmd.exe shell, cd to your qWebIRC installation directory and run python .\compile.py (This will take a few seconds). To test it, run python .\run.py, which will launch qWebIRC on the default port 9090. You can terminate it cleanly by pressing CTRL+C twice in a row.
  11. Optional, if you want qWebIRC as a system service: Copy instsrv.exe and srvany.exe to %WINDIR%\system32\. Then run instsrv qWebIRC %WINDIR%\system32\srvany.exe. Actual service configuration is discussed below.
  12. Optional, if you want SSL, create a certificate and a private key in PEM format using OpenSSL. If you don’t know how to do that, get OpenSSL [from here] and [read this] for a quick and simple solution. Create a subfolder SSL\ in your qWebIRC installation directory and put the certificate and key files in there. When ran as a background service, the passphrase has to be removed from the key! Make sure to keep your key file safe from theft!

After that, you’ll have compiled Python byte code and compressed JavaScript code for the static part of the web frontend. If you chose to create the service stub as well, you’ll need to configure the service first, otherwise it won’t really do anything. Find the service in your registry by running regedit. It should be in HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\, called qWebIRC.

Here:

qWebIRC service

A qWebIRC service, configured to run the XIN.at chat with SSL on port 8080.

My Windows 2000 Server is German, but I guess it’s still understandable. The values are all REG_SZ / strings. Set the following three:

  1. AppDirectory (the working directory, should be the installation dir of qWebIRC).
  2. Application (the application to be launched by the service, so python.exe).
  3. AppParameters (the parameters to be passed to Python for launching qWebIRCs’ run.py. Here, I’m specifying a port to run on, as well as SSL certificate and key files to load, so qWebIRC can automatically switch to HTTPS).

Now, go to your system control panel, create a simple, restricted user to run qWebIRC as (if you don’t have a suitable one already) and make sure that user has permissions to read & execute the qWebIRC and Python 2.5 installations. For the qWebIRC\ directory the user also needs write access. Then, go to the Administrative Tools in the system control panel and configure the service qWebIRC to run as that restricted user.

Start the service and you should be done.

Of course, you can always just run a shell and launch it interactively from the command prompt as well, which is very useful for debugging by the way.

If you click on the web chat on the top right on this page, you can try it out for yourself! :) It may not look as fancy as webchat2, but it works a lot faster and is far more stable!

Ah, you’d have to accept the self-signed certificate of course, your web browser will likely warn you about it.

And that’s that. Now visitors not only have easy access to my IRC chat server, but also one that works properly and doesn’t consume a ton of resources. ;)